Saturday, 11 May 2019

Practical PDA training

Every week see children who have demand avoidance, some will be very anxious so need to control, others will have PDA (Pathological Demand Avoidance). We don't need to get into the debate of whether this exists or not but we do need to understand why children are demand-avoidant, so we can better help them.

We are running an informative and practical training day on Saturday June 15th at Cannock Fire Station 9.30-3.30 where I will go through what PDA is and is not, in the morning, and Rachel Tenacious will deliver a workshop on low-arousal approaches in the afternoon. These approaches work with all anxious children.

This is great CPD for any professional (we are registered UK training providers so you will receive a credible certificate for your CPD file):

Teachers: you will receive information to help you understand children in your school, what it means to have PDA and learn strategies which work for those children

Speech and language Therapists/Educational Psychologists: you will be able to understand sufficiently to be able to assess new clients and then understand how you need to tailor therapy in order for it to work.

Parents: When we understand our children, we can better help them, you will also learn strategies to help at home.

£90 including lunch.

So book today, as spaces are limited to allow for better participation.

www.bookwhen.com/smalltalk

Libby Hill is a multi-award winning speech and language therapist who appeared in Channel 4s Born Naughty. She sees children with PDA from all over the UK and occasionally abroad. She is part of the PDA professional's group and the PDA Research group. She supports PDA action and the PDA Society. She is co-writing a book about Parental Perspectives of PDA

Rachel  Tenacious is a late diagnosed autistic parent with three children aged between 30 and 16. H is her youngest child who was diagnosed with autism at age 9 and selective mutism at 15. She removed H from the education system in 2015 after she had what we now know as an autistic burn-out. The school system didn’t suit H at all but home ed was  amazing. She shares her experience at support groups.  

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