Thursday, 18 May 2017

ASPERGER’S SYNDROME IN 13-16 YEAR OLDS – a review


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This easy to read informative book is written by Alis Rowe, the founder of The Girl With The Curly Hair.

There are many different books available on autism spectrum conditions, but not so many which are written by those who have an Autism Spectrum Condition themselves, so that makes this book all the more helpful. Unless you experience first-hand you can never fully understand, so the best resources and research you can find are those that are written and offered by those the condition themselves. Alis gives a real insight into Asperger’s syndrome and some of the hurdles teenagers with the condition may face.

With this book focusing on the early teen years, age 13-6 years, it gives a more direct look into Aspergers and what that can mean for this age group. Not only does this book offer information, reassurance and comfort to those with Asperger’s themselves, I also think this book could be a great help in allowing parents, siblings and family/ friends of the person with Asperger’s to grasp a better understanding.

Asperger’s Syndrome In 13-16 Year Olds, is written in such a straight forward way, it’s a very easy read but it still manages to focus on so much valuable information. It really gives you a clear idea of what living with Asperger’s can be like and it encourages you to learn about the similarities and differences between people who are neurotypical and those who have an ASC. Alis Rowe has given some useful advice and reminders, which will be really helpful to many. Alis has also encouraged the readers to see that difference is not wrong; it is something that a person should be aware of and there can be many positives with being different. She has included a very simple but effective illustration of an example of thinking in an alternative way, which shows that difference is something that can be embraced. This illustration also includes the caption “She sees the world differently”.

It’s almost as if this book has been stripped of unnecessary detail, which allows it to focus on key points and key messages, which is extremely beneficial. Alis talks about many aspects of having AS, including: sensory challenges, friendships, feeling lonely amongst others, the stresses of the school environment, the difficulties of the journey of adolescents, special interests and why those with AS might have some, or all, of these differences and challenges. I think this book is a must have for all teenagers with Asperger’s syndrome who are feeling confused and alone in being different.



Natasha Dale


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